“Remembering Tiananmen in the Umbrella Movement’s Wake” (Origins, June 8, 2015)

Last year, the twenty-fifth anniversary of the 1989 Tiananmen student movement and its brutal crackdown made major headlines. China-watchers, journalists, and academics commemorated June 4—as the event is called for short—with articles and books, and with lectures and roundtables.

Read more at: https://origins.osu.edu/connecting-history/remembering-tiananmen-umbrella-movement-s-wake-politics-commemoration-hong-kong.

“Exhibiting Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement: An end or a beginning?” (China Policy Institute, June 4, 2015)

May 17th in Hong Kong marked the opening of a two-week ‘Umbrella Festival,’ a pro-democracy sit-in protest that lasted from September to December 2014. The Umbrella Movement was one of the largest political demonstrations the city had ever seen.

Read more at: https://cpianalysis.org/2015/06/04/exhibiting-hong-kongs-umbrella-movement-an-end-or-a-beginning/.

“A New Opera and Hong Kong’s Utopian Legacy” (China File, April 10, 2015)

This year, the 43rd annual Hong Kong Arts Festival commissioned a chamber opera in three acts called Datong: The Chinese Utopia. Depicting the life and times of Kang Youwei (1858-1927), a philosopher and reformer of China’s last Qing dynasty, it premiered in the theater of the Hong Kong City Hall.

Read more at: http://www.chinafile.com/reporting-opinion/culture/new-opera-and-hong-kongs-utopian-legacy.

“What Does Hong Kong’s Post-Protest Report Signal for Relations with Beijing?” (China File, January 8, 2015)

This week’s “Report on the Recent Community and Political Situation in Hong Kong” underscores the way the Hong Kong government has and continues to portray its position vis-à-vis the Umbrella Movement. Local media reportage has focused on Pan-Democrats and activists’ objections to the way the movement is represented.

Read more at: http://www.chinafile.com/conversation/what-does-hong-kongs-post-protest-report-signal-relations-beijing.

“What Hong Kong’s Occupy Movement Can Learn From History” (The Nation, September 12, 2014)

Last week at Hong Kong’s Chinese University, a crowd gathered around a replica of the statue Goddess of Democracy. Beneath hand-lettered banners calling on fellow students to “shoulder their historic mission,” several generations of student union presidents discussed a proposal to boycott classes. Read more at: https://www.thenation.com/article/what-hong-kongs-occupy-movement-can-learn-history/.